Developing a Vision Statement

  WHAT

Developing a vision statement for your organization gives you a clear idea of where you are headed and what your organization will ideally look like in the future. Ideally, a vision statement should be formulated as a shorter-term objective, providing an attainable goal and a sense of purpose and inspiration for your employees.

Note that a vision statement should be based on your organization’s mission statement; If your organization has not yet created a mission statement, see Developing a Mission Statement for more information.

Our Developing a Vision Statement model allows you to:

1) Noodle: Identify where you envision your organization being in five years, considering your mission. 
2) Combine to eliminate duplicate or similar ideas.
3) Vote for the ideas you agree support your organization’s mission.
4) Rate the achievability of each vision and the impact it will have on your mission.
5) Use the top-rated results to craft formal vision statements.
6) Rate to what degree you support each of the statements as your company’s official vision statement.

  WHO

Developing a Vision Statement is intended for use by the organization’s upper management and leaders.

  WHY

A vision statement reflects the mountain you are currently trying to climb (OnStrategy, n.d.). It provides direction and inspiration for your organization, guiding your strategy and behaviors toward a unifying goal. Vision statements should be engaging, creating a vivid image in employees’ heads that provokes excitement and enthusiasm, as well as posing a challenge to inspire people to action (OnStrategy, n.d.).

Vision statements have a direct bearing on the bottom line and success of organizations (Tharp, 2007). Giving employees a unifying goal that is both engaging and logical for the organization means employees gain a sense of purpose and knowledge that they are working together toward a common goal; rather than seeing their positions as “laying stones”, they are able to see themselves instead as “building a cathedral” (OnStrategy, n.d.).

  HOW

1) NOODLE: Considering your mission, where do you envision your organization being in five years? 

2) COMBINE to eliminate duplicate or similar ideas.

3) VOTE: Validate all the ideas you agree support your organization’s mission.

4) RATE: How achievable is this vision?

  • 4 = Definitely achievable
  • 3 = Very achievable
  • 2 = Moderately achievable
  • 1 = Somewhat achievable
  • 0 = Not achievable at all

and what impact will it have on achieving your mission?

  • 4 = Huge impact
  • 3 = Big impact
  • 2 = Moderate impact
  • 1 = Minimal impact
  • 0 = No impact

5) Use the top-rated results to craft formal vision statements.

6) Rate to what degree you support each of the statements as your company’s official vision statement.

  RESULTS

  • Candid discussion and consensus on your organization’s future goals

  • Creation of a vision statement that all stakeholders agree on and support

  • A vision for the future that unifies and inspires both leaders and employee

  BENEFITS & IMPACT

This model will enable:

Quality  Develop a high-quality strategic direction for your organization.

 Efficiency – Align your strategy toward a specific goal, ensuring that only steps toward that vision for the future are taken, avoiding confusion and costly wastes of time and resources.

Engagement – With the input of a diverse group of stakeholders, create a unifying vision for your organization’s future to guide and inspire your employees.

Agility – Quickly identify and prioritize strategic choices that align with the pursuit of your specific goal.

  RELATED MODELS

  REFERENCES

OnStrategy. (n.d.). Phase 2: Developing Strategy.  https://onstrategyhq.com/resources/developing-your-strategy/

Tharp, J. (2007). Align project management with organizational strategy. Paper presented at PMI® Global Congress 2007—EMEA, Budapest, Hungary. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute.